Skip to main content

About your Search

20130801
20130831
STATION
KQED (PBS) 53
LANGUAGE
English 53
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
and then they pass a subset of that information to n.s.a., they call it a data stream. n.s.a. then takes that data stream and filters it again against specific criteria that it has, such as an e-mailaddrest protocol addresses. >> warner: so in that data
happening and so the probability that wholly domestic communications are being picked up by the n.s.a. is just the same as it has been at least since 2008. the way that n.s.a. handles those communications now is somewhat different. they are trying to basically segregate and quarantine the sets of communications that are likely to contain wholly domestic communications and handle them so that they don't get distributed throughout n.s.a. databases or into intelligence reports and make their way kind of throughout the
. collectively, those providers cover 75% of united states communications. the n.s.a. and the telephone companies have constructed sort of a two-step filtering system that means that the telecommunications companies do the first cut of filtering based on the guidelines that n.s.a. provide under the court order and then they pass a subset of that information to n.s.a., they
official today declassified documents showing that for three years, the national security agency, or n.s.a., collected more than 50,000 emails a year between americans with no connection to terrorism. the foreign intelligence surveillance court in 2011 ruled the collection methods unconstitutional. today's documents show changes the n.s.a made so the program-- designed to target foreign intelligence-- could continue.
that the court does provide a major check but on the other it's after the fact and the n.s.a. has a fair amount of leeway to construct its surveillance programs and there's a certain amount of self-policing that goes on there.>> warner: this program nw continues. did the fixes the n.s.a. made,
obtained from n.s.a. leaker edward snowden. they claimed the n.s.a. also bugged the european union's
of it contains information that is responsive to what n.s.a. is looking for with its foreign intelligence filters, but they have to hand over the whole bundle of communications, which may also include wholly domestic communications.
and maybe the nsa was spending money. we know 14.7 billion going to the cia every year.
for word of every doe midwest incommunication in this country. >> the idea that n.s.a. is keeping files on americans as a general rule just isn't true.ufd scores of rockets on the syrian city of homs as the assad regime celebrated army day. margaret warner gets the latest on the bloody civil war from npr's deborah amos. >> brown: law enforcement bids farewell to f.b.i. director robert mueller. ray suarez explores the transformation of the bureau after the 9-11 attacks. >> woodruff: and we hear from two u.s. senators leading the push to keep the military's sexual assault cases in the chain of command. gwen ifill talks to new hampshire republican kelly ayotte and missouri democrat claire mccaskill. >> the other side has wanted to make this argument about victims vs. uniforms. that's a false premise. this argument is about how we can protect victims the best. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation.
on the "newshour": bradley manning gets 35 years in jail; how the n.s.a. spies on internet activity and eleanor holmes norton looks back at the march on washington. but first, with the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: an egyptian court today ordered the release of ex-president hosni mubarak. a hearing was held at tora prison, where the ailing 85-year-old has been detained for two years. once freed, he'll be placed under house arrest on orders of egypt's prime minister. mubarak also faces charges of failing to prevent the deaths of protesters in the 2011 uprising that ousted him from power. meanwhile the european union held emergency talks on the egyptian crisis in brussels. its foreign policy chief, catherine ashton, said the e.u. member nations strongly condemn the recent spate of violence between the interim government and supporters of the muslim brotherhood. >> we've agreed, as well, to review the issue of our assistance to egypt with the understanding of assistance to the most vulnerable groups and to civil society must continue. member states have agreed to suspend e
. it is devastating. >> spying on americans. the nsa says that was a mistake. >> these are tools that are enemies,to be used on not on americans. >> radley manning. the escalating war on obamacare. >> under no circumstances will i for a continuing resolution that authorizes even one penny to this. >> and the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. >> you look at how far we have come, but we still have so far to go. >> opposition forces claim the syrian government is killing large numbers of civilians, men, women and children with chemical weapons. russia says the rebels stage the attacks to drum up opposition to the asad regime. the asad regime says the claim is baseless. here is what president obama said a year ago. nowe have communicated in uncertain terms what every player in the region -- with every player in the region that that is a line -- red line for us. >> senator john mccain says the red line threat is a joke. >> the president of the united states says it would be a red line and a game changer. he now sees that as a green light. means the word of the president of the united states
. obama and the nsa overhaul. >> i wanted to ask you about your evolution on the surveillance issues, even as recently as june you said that these -- the process was such that people should be comfortable with it, and now you are saying -- you are making these reforms and people should be comfortable with those. so why should the public trust you on this issue and why did you change your position multiple times? >> well, i think it's important to say -- i haven't ainvolved in my assessment of the actual programs. in light of thing changed environment where a whole set of questions have been raised, some in the most sensationalized manner possible, where these leaks are released drip by drip, one a week, to kind of maximize attention, and see if they can catch us at some imprecision on something. in light of that, it makes sense for us to go ahead, lay out what exactly we're doing, have a discussion with congress, have a discussion with industry, which is also impacted by this have a discussion with the civil libertarians and see, can we do this bert. >> that was president obama facing skep
you. >> woodruff: still to come on the newshour: overreach at the n.s.a.; a planet-hunter goes dark; opening up a pristine rain forest to oil drilling; shields and brooks on the week's news; plus, harper and musslewhite on playing the blues. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> reporter: the number of dead in thursday's car bombing in beirut, lebanon, went up at least 22 today, with more than 300 wounded. it was the deadliest attack there in nearly three decades, engulfing a busy street in fire and smoke. the site is near a complex where the shiite militant group hezbollah holds rallies. today, the group's leader, sheikh hassan nasrallah, blamed sunni radicals. he pledged to double the number of hezbollah forces helping fight sunni rebels in syria. a sudden wave of refugees from syria is pouring into northern iraq. u.n. refugee officials reported today that many come from aleppo, syria's largest city, and their numbers approach 8,000 a day. they've been crossing at a new bridge over the tigris river. there already are more than 150,000 syrian refugees regist
to both the u.s. national security agency, or the nsa, and its british gchq.part, rg c h q -- the man who leaped thousands of documents to the guardian newspaper, edward snowden, is now in russia. controversially used counter-terrorism powers to stop a man for nine hours, also is seeking his computers and electronics. today after increasing pressure, the government for their silence. the home secretary saying she was told in advance, but that the decision was made by police, not her. >> i think is right, given that is the first duty of the government to protect the public. someone with highly sensitive gosselin information that could help terrorists and lead to a loss of lives, then it is right that the police act. >> downing street also said it had been kept informed about david miranda's detention. what the authorities wanted to know is whether, since his travel was paid by the guardian, and he has carried information in that past, he was in possession of some of edward seldin's classified documents. those documents reveal the number of previously secret intelligence programs, including
down on what n.s.a. is doing? >> well, the great thing is we live a democracy. if we don't like what n.s.a. is doing we can get rid of the government and put in a different government. i think -- actually we've been collecting this information for so long, and long before n.s.a. was collecting it. let me tell you who was collecting it: american express, visa, all of your credit card data we have -- all of your financial records. this whole issue of privacy is utterly fascinating to me. for example, we could do a much better job in the whole new area of privacy which is medical records. >> rose: right. >> if we could take our medical records and put them in a database we could then figure out what drugs worked for what people. so we take all the medical records then all the gino mick data about the people and we put in the a database and figure out what therapies they're getting, what therapies work and don't work because there's this big database where you should take lipitor, you should take crestor. it could be very scientific. we could do a draw dramatically better job of treating peopl
like three-letter acronyms, n.s.a.'s current p.r. problem notwithstanding. h.v.f. stands for hard, valuable fun. those are the three necessary conditions for me to get out of bed and go to work. hard. it's no fun solving problems that are easy. somebody's already doing it. it's not defensible. it's not that exciting so to solve not a hard problem so it has to be difficult to do. hard. valueable? it better make the world a bert place. bang your head against the wall, you might break the wall or break the head, it's not helping anybody. valuable means impacting the world for the better. you have to be passionate about it. i've done a few things in my life that i felt deeply about and didn't care and some things that i didn't say t care that much and fun is the short hand for whatever hard problem i solve, i have to ultimately care about. so hard, valuable, fun. >> there's things you read about you don't sleep much at one time. >> i don't sleep much. >> rose: is it -- what is it? three to five hours? >> i think i average four and a half these days. >> well, that's three to five. how
nsa contractor, edward snowden, has granted a years asylum in russia. this has strained relations between moscow and russia. president obama is under pressure to retaliate. an upcoming summit is in question. >> this was the moment this afternoon when edward snowden wearing a black rucksack with his back to the camera climbed into a car and disappeared into russia, the biggest country in the world. he had been stuck in limbo in the transit zone of the airport. he insisted he would not go to america to face trial. me aht, his lawyer showed copy of the document that grants him polit asylum in russia for at least a year. he said that he is in a hotel but he would not say where. >> the question of his security is obviously very important. a great powers trying to catch him. the name of the power is the united states of america. >> edward snowden himself said over the past eight weeks, we have seen the obama administration show no respect for international or domestic law but in the end, the law is winning. this evening, however, russia's longest serving dissident pondered whether he kn
today and said he doesn't think the leaker from the nsa, edward snowden, is a patriot and released a series of reforms he would like to implement. here is how the president described what he would like to do. >> we can't and must be more transparent so i directed the intelligence community to make public as much information about these programs as possible. we have already declassified unprecedented information about the nsa but we can go furter. >> and asked about who he'll pick for the next chairman of the federal reserve he said he didn't want to tip his hand of who he would pick but has two candidates and explained why the white house was defending larry summers in public. take a listen. >> the perception that mr. summers might have an inside track simply had to do with a bunch of attacks that i was hearing on mr. summer's preemptively, which is a standard washington exercise that i don't like. >> reporter: so tyler, obviously, this is very personal for the president. he has a relationship with larry summers. he didn't like to see the piling on. that might explain leaks we saw
to show off skills and technology to fort such a tax. much of the talk this year is about admitted nsa leaker edward snowden was who given temporary asylum in russia today and where the next edward snowden may come from. the answer may surprise you. we may have more. >> reporter: tyler, normally here at black hat government security expert and independent hackers and private company executives who focus on cybersecurity work well together. this year, however, a lot of tension in the room, a much different story, the number one top pick of decision as you have said is the revelations about snowden about what the nsa is up to. >> people in the community are very, fairly skeptical. they are professional skeptics. >> reporter: the nsa's surveillance programs are a big top pick at the black hat conference since edward snowden leaked information in june. how much data the government is collecting, some say the biggest treat comes from an unexpected source. >> maybe edward snowden is the tip of the iceberg but i'm waiting for facebook leaker, amazon, some other search engine, somebody that ha
disclosed by nsa leaker edward snowden show a massive amount of money set aside for u.s. spying operations outside the cia or the nsa. amen jaifers joins us with me. sounds like a spy novel. >> absolutely. this is one of the most grossly held secrets of the intelligence, how much does it spend on the things that it does, how many employees does the united states intelligence community actually have? they want to keep that secret. thanks to this leak from edward snowd snowden, "the washington post" broke a blockbuster story and detailed for the first time what exactly is in the budget for the intelligence committee, including more than 21,000 employees at the cia. the first time we've seen this level. >> very fascinating reading that story. i know you looked over it. what stood out most for you? what do we know now more than before? >> in this era of drone warfare around the world, the cia reporting a 14.7 billion-dollar budget, that makes it the biggest component for a long time folks thought maybe the cia was no longer the dominant player in u.s. intelligence, maybe the national spashl in
: the release comes amid reports of a new n.s.a. spying program on internet activity. we look at the latest revelations and the secret court at the center of the controversy. >> ifill: then, ben bernanke's tenure as federal reserve chairman nears its end, as the debate over who will replace him begins. we examine how that choice could affect the economic recovery. >> brown: egypt's government ordered police to take all means necessary to disband protests in support of the ousted president. margaret warner explores the potential for violence and the actions of the new military rule. >> ifill: and in india, child labor is outlawed, but a staggering number of children still toil away. fred de sam lazaro reports on efforts to change that practice. >> the combination of official and middle-class indifference, and dire poverty, drives perhaps 50 million children into the workplace. some as young as six or seven. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> supported by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committe
documents obtained from n.s.a. leaker edward snowden. they claimed the n.s.a. also bugged the european union's offices in washington. in china, disgraced political figure bo xilai now awaits the verdict in his corruption trial. in closing arguments today, bo denounced the two main witnesses against him. he charged his wife is deranged and his former police chief is dishonest. prosecutors argued bo made millions of dollars illegally and interfered in a murder investigation. he was a rising star in the ruling communist party before the scandal broke. the school year is just getting started in most of the u.s., and already the weather has intervened. severe heat in the midwest today forced schools in at least six states to end classes early. readings reached nearly 100 degrees in much of the region, including nebraska, iowa, minnesota, the dakotas and illinois. many of the affected schools have sections that are not air conditioned. on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average lost 64 points to close at 14,946. the nasdaq fell a fraction of a point to close at 3657. those are some of
would do irreparable harm to the n.s.a.'s ability to collect information, that terrorists were changing their communication patterns. maybe this information in the last few days maybe indicates they haven't changed so much and the n.s.a. isn't as damaged or harmed as some may have thought. >> ifill: sounds like a story that is just beginning to unfold. thank you both so much. >> thank you. >> suarez: now, the sale of a legendary newspaper to an internet legend. the "washington post" company sold its flagship paper to jeff bezos, founder of amazon, for $250 million. one family, the grahams, owned the "post" for four generations. the paper faced financial difficulties. revenues declined for seven consecutive years, including losses of $49 million in the first quarter of this year. for more on the surprising sale, we turn to tom rosenstiel, the executive director of the american press institute, a think tank for journalism. rosenstiel was a veteran newspaper reporter before becoming the founder and director of the pew project for excellence in journalism for many years. tom, if you live so
. the nsa hasn't been totally kneecapped in terms of its capabilities. so i think it is an important point to keep in mind. >> it's also become quite political. yesterday on the sunday talk shows you could see a lot of congressman from both sides losay, the nsa program is working. we need to keep it going. this is presiltionly why we have it. this is why it is a defective fool and this is from democrats and republicans. i think will you see the administration use whatever intercepts were picked up on this aqap plot to show that you know despite the reservations this is an effective program and they're going to keep doing it. >> thank you very much, peter, thank you, jay. thank you very much, mark. >> thank you. >> we'll be back. stay with us. >> rose: atul gawande is here, a surgeon at boston's brigham and women's hospital. a professor at the harvard school of public health and harvard medical school and a staff writer for "the new yorker" magazine. he has written extensively and thoughtfully about the flaws of our health-care system. his readership extends all the way to the white house.
widely used in the world today. her family never had a say in this. why did the nsa seek its buy-in now? >> what happened this year is different. hela cells, yes, have been used in almost every laboratory, including my own. now what we've had happen is read out the complete d.n.a. instruction book, the genome of hela cells, laying out all kinds of details about why those cells grow so rapidly, but also revealing something about henrietta's original d.n.a. instruction book, which,sh, has implications for the family, and her blood relatives raised concerns, rightly so, that this information being freely available on the internet might be placing them at risk for people learning things about their medical risks for the future, that they would like to keep private. >> warner: so this agreement you negotiated with the family, what does it grant them? what does it give them? >> well, over three long meetings in the evening in baltimore with the family-- and i give them a huge amount of credit for rallying together and dealing with some pretty complicated scientific facts-- ultimately, they ar
and appointing an n.s.a. representative committed to privacy, and inviting outside experts to review how the government does its surveillance. the measures come as the administration has faced mounting scrutiny over its surveillance programs following the leaks from former spy agency contractor edward snowden. mr. obama was asked if today's move changed his mindset about snowden. >> is he now more a whistle- blower than he is a hacker, as you called him at one point, or somebody that shouldn't be filed charges? and should he be provided more protection? is he a patriot? >> i don't think mr. snowden was a patriot. as i said in my opening remarks, i called for a thorough review of our surveillance operations before mr. snowden made these leaks. my preference-- and i think the american people's preference-- would have been for a lawful, orderly examination of these laws; a thoughtful, fact-based debate that would then lead us to a better place, because i never made claims that all the surveillance technologies that have developed since the time some of these laws had been put in place someh
. >> revelation that the nsa has been doing very, very deep spying of average citizens, aren't engaged in crime. now there is the key stroke technology. you know? >> yeah. right. >> isn't that oakland is trying to draw day line around it. say, sand, per se. >> entirely so. deaf niltly, national surveillance conversation we are having plays a lot into what is going on. there is some concern that oakland which has undeniably been in disarray for a while. may not be the best agency. [ indiscernible ] >> there are more eyes on the street with cameras. is this an agency you want having this awareness of your street. >> there are so few cops. we cannot target our policing with the few cops we have until we have enough cops. >> assuming they have somebody watching the cameras not using them after the fact. >> do they? >> that costs money. >> we don't know yet. >> before weave leave this topic. of law enforcement. josh, the supreme court rejected gary brown's request for a stay. insistence that the state release 10,000 criminals to get the population down. where does that leave jerry brown and public s
are tied into n.s.a. intercepts. gwen: secrecy still remains. this was a lot of talk but secrecy is still something that this administration's wedded to. >> one of the things that the president has struggled with is this idea that he believes the checks are there. the potential for abuse has been limited. but he struggles with this idea that he's not trusted. and that was -- that was a question posed to him today. do you understand why americans are not trusting that you're saying we have this capability but we won't abuse it? one of the interesting things is i think this president is looking far ahead now at the next president and thinking part of his legacy is to put things together so that he can, you know, all presidents think they're on the side of the angels. but to hand it over to his successor in some way. that the american people are comfortable with it and it will prevail after him. >> and also important to remember, as i think martha alluded to, the things the president did not say. he did not say that -- that the collection of data about your phone calls, those phone records,
didn't think katrina was responded to very well. you don't like the nsa revelations. if you're on the right distrust of big government has always been an article of fate. it's not just cynicism and it's not just media exploitation, there is a genuine reaction against in part philosophically incompetence of government. >> what about the idea or ideal of a public good that has run through our history? much of their time contemplating this idea of a public good, trying to set up a situation in which partisan impulses, internal impulses, regional impulses state impulses in which all of these lab will be tamed down now where it will function -and produce later legislators that will act in a 1345u8 public good.-this is the republican idea originally and of course that's worked better and less well over the years since. i think what we really lost now is a conversation about it. i mean it's sort of been taken for granted that this doesn't partisan warfare in washington, at least having mor gestures toward the public. >> you got a very
of information he has about american intelligence about the n.s.a. for their own good. that would be acting they might consider in their own national interest. so are they doing that giving him everything he knows? >> and you can ask the same question about the chinese when he was in hong kong. >> rose: what do you assume? >> i would assume that their intelligence services would be delinquent in their duty if they didn't make every effort to do that. i don't know the answer. >> rose: i talked to a former c.i.a. person and said would we be doing that if we had the opportunity? of course. >> his father says it hasn't happened. i don't know. i don't know. >> rose: okay, what about syria? is -- where do you think -- where do you think the effort to put together some kind of -- and the united states desperately wants and john kerry desperately wants russian cooperation to figure out a way to stop syria from becoming a stalemate and a civil war that just goes on and on and on. >> rose: and putin wants it, too. so you would think that would be enough to act on. here's the conflict no story began y
't likent iraq, you didn't think katrina was responded to ve very well. you don't like the nsa -revelations. if you're on the right distrust of big government has always been an article of fate. it's not just cynicism and it's not just media exploitation. there is a genuine reaction against in part philosophically but also what's perceived as the incompetence of government. >> what about the idea or ideal of a public good that has runun through our history.->> the founders of course spent much of their time contemplatingting this idea of a public good trying to set up a situation in which partisan impulses, internal impulses regional impulses, state impulses in which all of these would be tamped down enough that in fact the government would function tamed down now where it will functio gislators who would act in broad public good.egislators that will act in a 1345u8 public small r republican ideal originally.nd of and of course that's worked better and less well over the years since. i think what we really lost now is a convers
that the n.s.a., which is so prominent in the news these days slistenning carefully to the types of communications going on. now, that communication can sometimes be ambiguous. but if you put all that together, it can clearly point in the direction of one actor in this, and i think there is probably, as has been saished the preponderance of evidence-- public or not public-- falls on the side of the syrian government did this. >> brown: the context is what happened in iraq, where you were involved, where you looked at what happened ooferreds. to what degree as what happened there affected how these kind-- how this kind of work it done? >> well, the weapons inspectors it turned out did a much better job than anybody thought. their teakniques and methods have improved a fair amount. on the other hand, the intelligence community, they've had their fingers burned. they got it massively long in 2002 and 2003. so they are going to be ve reluctant to make categorical statements -- like slam dunk-- to policy makers. they will caveat their language and that will make policy makers' lives m
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)